Weekend Work on an Hourly Scale

Most schedules show work that takes place during the work week, but in this article, we will explore creating a Gantt chart that displays, on an hourly scale, work done over the weekend.

Below is a schedule with tasks for Saturday and Sunday between 8:00 am and 3:00 pm.

The next step is to launch OnePager and create the chart by going to Add-ins > OnePager > New. After clicking New, you should see the “OnePager choices” window; we will select an out-of-the-box template designed for an hourly view. To do this, click Change… and then Browse, which will bring you to the template folder. Select the “Hourly View” template, and then finish creating your chart.

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Filtering your Task Links (3/3): Key Milestones

Welcome to part 3 of the task link filtering trilogy! Through our task link journey, we have covered how to display dependencies that are on a Critical Path (Part 1) and also dependencies that are set for Future Dates (Part 2). If you missed either of those two blog posts, I highly suggest you treat yourself to the wealth of knowledge it offers regarding task link filtering.

We will discuss how to filter your task links so that only ones with a milestone as a successor are displayed. To do this, we will first need to create a chart with task links enabled. You can enable the task links by going into Chart Properties > Task Links and checking the box “Show data-driven links.”

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Filtering your Task Links (2/3): Future Tasks

Welcome to part 2 of the task link filtering trilogy! Our last blog article discussed how to show task links on a Critical Path (Part 1). This portion will explore how you can filter your task links in two more ways, both relating to future dates. The first will go over how to filter task links with a status of “Future Tasks,” while the second will be how to filter task links to only show when they are to the right of your Time Cursor, which is another way of looking at future dependencies.

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Filtering your Task Links (1/3): Critical Path

We will be doing a three-part blog series that explores smart ways to filter your task links in a OnePager chart. This first article will discuss how to display dependencies for only the tasks that are on the critical path. We will use the Microsoft Project example below, where Site 1 and all of its subtasks are on the critical path, and all of the tasks underneath Site 2 are non-critical:

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Multiple Values in Conditional Formatting

In my view, among the many great features of OnePager, none beat Conditional Formatting. With Conditional Formatting, you can create rules to change the color, shape, fill, and other properties of tasks and milestones based on specific rules that you set. However, what happens when you have multiple values to which you need the same rule to apply? You could create a bunch of separate rules, but that’s a lot of work. In this article, we will go over how you can create a conditional formatting rule that tests for multiple conditions at once.

Imagine with me, if you will, that you have a schedule with individual resources assigned to different tasks. Each resource is part of a specific team in your organization, and you would like to be able to color tasks based on the team that the people belong to, not based on their individual names.

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Color-Coding by a Custom Status field in Microsoft Project

Many of you already use OnePager’s conditional formatting to automatically assign colors to your charts based on Microsoft Project’s Status field. But what if you need status calculated differently than how Microsoft Project does it out of the box?

In this article, I’ll show you how to create your own custom status field in Microsoft Project, and then bring that into OnePager to drive the color-coding of your timeline.

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Removing Inactive Tasks from your OnePager Gantt Chart

Did you know that OnePager can automatically remove inactive tasks from your report, even if you still have them flagged for import in Microsoft Project?

Let’s start with a simple Microsoft Project schedule. Notice that all five tasks are active, and all five tasks have “Flag 20” set to “Yes”:

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Displaying Risk in OnePager – Heatmaps

It’s not very often that you might need to look at your entire plan to pick out some sort of pattern. Analyzing our project data is usually not as simple as that.

However, when you’re looking to evaluate the timing of your risk and exposure to outside forces, it becomes important to step back and view the entire project.

In Stephen Few’s book Now You See It: Simple Visualization Techniques for Quantitative Analysis, the chapter on Time-Series Analysis and Heatmaps is very relevant to this specific data visualization in OnePager.

Heatmaps, according to Few, are “any display that uses color to encode quantitative values.” Below is an example of a traditional heatmap.

Election Results

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MPUG: Consider Bringing a Portfolio to Your Next PM Job Interview

Our friends at MPUG have published my article on why project managers should create a portfolio of past projects when applying for a new PM job, instead of just the traditional resume:

Consider Bringing a Portfolio to Your Next PM Job Interview

Create a portfolio of past projects when applying for your next PM job.

In the article, I cover how to select which projects to include, and how to go about the mechanics of creating a portfolio of projects that will resonate with prospective employers. The article also includes a sample portfolio of projects to provide an illustration of what employers might be looking for.

If you’re not already an MPUG member or don’t receive their newsletter, it’s worth signing up. MPUG provides great content for the project management community, especially for those of us who spend a lot of time working with Microsoft Project.